Catholic Herald, 10 June 1966: Yes, but…

In this week’s Catholic Herald (which sadly now I must read in the hard copy as the trial period of free editions on the paper’s app has expired) has an interesting, and no doubt deliberately chosen, excerpt from the corresponding edition of 50 years ago. From memory it is on the page with Piers Paul Read’s column near the very back of the paper.

It refers to the then 18-month-old permission given to parishes in England and Wales to celebrate Mass versus populum, facing the people. It notes that only 10% of parishes had taken up this permission; at those 10% of parishes the change was said to be very popular with the people. Mmmm. Continue reading “Catholic Herald, 10 June 1966: Yes, but…”

Friday Penance: a dose of The Tablet (but sugared)

Friday is traditionally a day of penance for Christians. So in a frenzy of penitential excess I betook myself to the Letters pages of The Tablet. In never fails to give the psycho-emotional equivalent of a goodly number of strokes of the discipline. It did not fail today.

The various “Outrageds of Tunbridge Wells” have a remarkable knack for flogging dead horses, hoping against hope in advocating their own private Idahos as the model of the Church for all of us.

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Why Benedictines are liturgical; and why Jesuits should be too

The title above is crude, but it is designed to remind all those in the Benedictine familia of one of our foundational and essential charisms; and to alert the Church universal to the fact that this Benedictine charism is in fact a catholic one, a charism that is shared by the whole Church. The debates on the liturgy—often illuminating and uplifting, often frustrating and disheartening—will never bear fruit without a sound understanding of the foundation and essential character of liturgy.

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The Rise and Rise of St Mary’s University

The Rise and Rise of St Mary’s University

Last night I was privileged to be able to attend the formal launch of the Benedict XVI Centre for Religion and Society at St Mary’s University, Twickenham. Amazingly I was even invited to the pre-launch drinks and post-launch supper. I was privileged to see some familiar faces (Dr Jacob Phillips for example) and meet some new ones (Ben Ryan from the ecumenical think-tank Theos, and Dr Chris Altieri from Vatican Radio). It was good to be there as there a clear feeling that something good was afoot for the Church in England and Wales. Continue reading “The Rise and Rise of St Mary’s University”

Co-patrons?

In comments on the previous post about St George, Dr Joe Shaw implies that we could have two patrons, or even three if we count St Edward the Confessor (whom I am not biased against, as his feast day is my birthday). Continue reading “Co-patrons?”

That foreign man, St George

When asked to celebrate the conventual Mass today, St George’s day, I was a little conflicted. For our patron, St Edmund King and Martyr (†869/70), was the original patron of England, St George only being established in that role in 1348. In recent years there have been petitions to the government to restore St Edmund as English patron, to no avail. For not a few among the English, St Edmund is still the rightful patron.

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Amoris Laetitia: All things to all?

Most of us have probably read a great deal of commentary on Amoris Laetitia (AL). Some commentaries are laudatory, some condemnatory, some nod to its weaknesses but strive hard to extol its virtues, some ignore its virtues and seek to expose an alleged wolf in sheep’s clothing. When the dust settles what will we find?

Continue reading “Amoris Laetitia: All things to all?”