A random ramble with Colonel Blimp

A few miles south of Hadrian’s Wall, and at the eastern end of Northumberland, I am making use of a cottage generously offered by benefactors for the purpose of breaking the back of a short dissertation. The best laid plans of mice and monks, of course… it is breaking me.

It is perhaps not totally effective, or even healthy, to attempt to overcome the incessant distractions of pervious months and seek a near complete solitude for 10 days in order to form one’s reading and thinking into a coherent pattern, transcribe it to computer and expect a satisfying result. There have been periods of waxing and of waning in the operations of the intellect, and yesterday proved to be quite frustrating and indeed disheartening. The downside of solitude is that there is no one, apart from God and his heavenly court, to unload onto. And the heavenly ones, of course, do not usually respond immediately or audibly. Continue reading “A random ramble with Colonel Blimp”

Pulled posts and autumn courses

The particularly observant may have noticed that the two posts on my letter last week to The Tablet, in response to Fr O’Collins’ letter the week before, have been pulled. The more conspiracy-aware might think something sinister was afoot.

There is not.

A couple of days ago I received a friendly phone call from The Tablet‘s literary editor to advise me that the letter would be published this week. This surprised me as one reason for posting it here was in order not to let the moment pass. It may be that the moment will be longer to pass than I thought. I felt morally obliged to remind him that I had published the letter myself on this blog, since when one submits a letter, the confirmation of receipt comes with a request to confirm that the letter has not been published elsewhere.

There was no reaction to this, so to keep as much in the spirit of the enterprise it seemed to right to take down the posts on the letter. Once the coming edition of The Tablet has been out for a while I might edit the posts appropriately and reload them.

Also, the School of Annunciation has some interesting and useful courses on this Autumn which they feel would benefit many. The flyer is attached.



Beyond Ad Orientem: Final Gleanings from Sacra Liturgia 2016

In the home stretch now, with the last set of nuggets from Sacra Liturgia 2016. Continue reading “Beyond Ad Orientem: Final Gleanings from Sacra Liturgia 2016”

Beyond Ad Orientem: Further Gleanings from Sacra Liturgia 2016

Having, in the first gleanings, looked at Dr Bullivant’s small time bomb for the exegesis of the conciliar declaration on liturgy, it is time finally to extract the gems from the other talks at Sacra Liturgia 2016 in London a few weeks back.

This will be a light buffet not a banquet, a tasting menu not the full dishes. You can tell I am fasting today! Fuller details will be found in my series of posts from Sacra Liturgia in this blog. Continue reading “Beyond Ad Orientem: Further Gleanings from Sacra Liturgia 2016”

Sloppiness or spin?

This morning I read what would have to be one of the worst pieces of “analysis” I have come across. Dated Tuesday and found online at The Tablet, it is shoutingly entitled ‘POPE FRANCIS EFFECT’ CAUSES SURGE IN NUMBERS OF JESUIT PRIESTS. In it Rose Gamble tells us that an increase in Jesuit ordinations is due to the “Francis effect”. Really?

Certainly Francis is The Tablet‘s sort of pope, and the Jesuits The Tablet‘s sort of order. This double preference is not clouding its logic, is it?

Continue reading “Sloppiness or spin?”

After Fr Hamel, a suggestion

Everywhere we are rightly being exhorted to pray in the wake of the barbaric murder of an elderly priest while about the Lord’s work. We are praying for him, though with the confidence that soon enough we shall be praying to him. We are praying for the other victims, and even for the demon-inspired murderers, just in case God got through at the very last gasp. We are praying for all the persecuted Church, and those who fall victim to hatred of Christ. We are praying for those who keep us safe. Continue reading “After Fr Hamel, a suggestion”

The Church of the martyrs comes closer to home

With the murder today of 86 year old Fr Jacques Hamel while he was offering Mass in the small church in Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray, near Rouen in Normandy, the persecution of Christians in foreign lands, especially the Middle East, has come a lot closer to home. A lot closer. The Church of the west in now directly caught up in the plight of the persecuted Church abroad.

A small church on the edge of a sizeable city in a politically unremarkable part of France, Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray could be St Anywhere. What priest in France, or Germany, or Belgium, or Holland… or Britain, heads into his church on a weekday to offer Mass and has even the slightest conception that he could possibly be murdered by enemies of Christ? Continue reading “The Church of the martyrs comes closer to home”