Sacristans and Justice

One of the jobs yours truly has at the monastery is sacristan. For the last 6 to 9 months I have taken on washing and ironing the smaller of the sacred linens—purificators, lavabo towels, corporals and amices. The housekeeping staff do the bigger cloths for the altar and credence tables. Continue reading “Sacristans and Justice”

A Striking Chalice: Once Lost, Now Found

There’s nothing like procrastination to prompt a blog post.

Yet this post obeys the adage, carpe diem. For yesterday I discovered a chalice we had feared lost. It belonged to our Fr Terence who died last October after years battling cancer. He came as close to peace as he ever did in his last year, and he died well-prepared for his encounter face to face with Christ. As a young monk he was at the vanguard of the reformers in the 1960s, and until the end he gave short shrift to liturgical or theological recidivism. He was a Vatican II priest of a particular stamp, and his hopes had been pinned on the Council unreservedly. His faith was not feigned and his commitment was utterly sincere. Continue reading “A Striking Chalice: Once Lost, Now Found”

Co-patrons?

In comments on the previous post about St George, Dr Joe Shaw implies that we could have two patrons, or even three if we count St Edward the Confessor (whom I am not biased against, as his feast day is my birthday). Continue reading “Co-patrons?”

That foreign man, St George

When asked to celebrate the conventual Mass today, St George’s day, I was a little conflicted. For our patron, St Edmund King and Martyr (†869/70), was the original patron of England, St George only being established in that role in 1348. In recent years there have been petitions to the government to restore St Edmund as English patron, to no avail. For not a few among the English, St Edmund is still the rightful patron.

Continue reading “That foreign man, St George”

Amoris Laetitia: All things to all?

Most of us have probably read a great deal of commentary on Amoris Laetitia (AL). Some commentaries are laudatory, some condemnatory, some nod to its weaknesses but strive hard to extol its virtues, some ignore its virtues and seek to expose an alleged wolf in sheep’s clothing. When the dust settles what will we find?

Continue reading “Amoris Laetitia: All things to all?”

Did you notice?

What with all the talk the last few days about Amoris Laetitia, we might have missed seeing, or if seeing, missed the significance of, a brief note on the Lefebvrist Society of St Pius X (SSPX). It was published in La Croix, and picked up by the Rorate Caeli blog. I quote it below:
Continue reading “Did you notice?”

A glaring omission

In my haste and weariness, manifestations of the frail flesh of my humanity which cancels out all guilt, I omitted one commentator from my list in the previous post on the divided opinion in the wake of Amoris Laetitia. You will find it a bracing digestivo that will help remedy any mental gastric reflux from so much heavy intellectual food.

It is from a source close to Eccleston Square. Bruvver Eccles no less. Click his official portrait below and read on, and guffaw and snort with consideration for others. His opinions are not necessarily my own, etc etc. Amen.

new-eccles-biretta